March 2019 Health Newsletter

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Current Articles

» Boost Your Immunity with ACUPUNCTURE and CHINESE MEDICINE
» Reducing Risk of Recurring Low Back Pain for Office Workers
» New Study Finds Obese Seniors Can Improve Disability with Diet and Exercise
» Even Bad Cholesterol in the Moderate Range Can Spell Early Death

Boost Your Immunity with ACUPUNCTURE and CHINESE MEDICINE

The cold season can prove to be a difficult time for many of us to keep healthy and fight off the seasonal colds and flu. Chinese Medicine, by the use of acupuncture, dietary therapy and Chinese herbs, offers a natural alternative to help your body stay balanced and function at its best. The stimulation of certain acupuncture points has been proven to increase the number of white blood cells which fight off infections, boost your lungs function and lower the levels of stress-induced hormones, such as cortisol, which suppress your immune system. Given the preventative power of this medicine, regular acupuncture treatments in conjunction with herbs (when needed) are recommended during this time of the year.
Here’s a few additional tips that will improve your chances at staying healthy:

• eat foods that are warm, cooked and nourishing as this helps your body have more energy for fighting off the bugs that you come in contact with; this is the perfect time for making teas, soups, stews and steaming foods
• make sure you are eating enough vegetables and fruits daily; cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, swiss chard, bok choy, and daikon radish increase immune cells and reduce your chances of developing certain types of cancer; carrots, goji berries, sweet potato, spinach, butternut squash are rich in beta-carotene and promote new skin cells as well as protect the mucosal lining of the lungs and digestive system; increase intake of vitamin C rich foods such as watermelon and cantaloupe, kiwis, strawberries, blackberries, grapefruits, red and yellow peppers
• avoid eating lots of dairy, salads, or other cold, raw foods; avoid eating large portions, rather eat frequent small meals
• keep energy up and avoid exhausting yourself
• be sure to get enough sleep and rest
• avoid stress and emotional issues
• when you go out into a windy and cold environment, keep warm and protect yourself with clothing such as a scarf
• after washing your hair, make sure it is dry before going outside or before going to bed
• a cool shower once a day boosts immunity
• exercise outside, whatever the weather, is beneficial
• take probiotics- beneficial bacteria when properly maintained in your gut are one of the body’s strongest lines of defense.

Author: Dr. Ramona Goldman
Source: 2014 Newsletter
Copyright: Family Life Chiropractic Center 2014


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Reducing Risk of Recurring Low Back Pain for Office Workers

Are you an office worker who has experienced low back pain in the past?  If so, you are at a significantly greater risk of future low back pain.  According to a one-year study of 669 healthy office workers, people who had previous episodes of low back pain were more likely to experience low back pain again.  The amount of recurring low back pain was also influenced by the frequency of work rest breaks as well as psychological stresses.  This study gives some clues as to how to avoid getting low back pain while at the office.

Here are some tips:

  • Take Frequent Desk Breaks. We are not talking about taking advantage of your employer and “shirking off” during the day for long periods of time. A quick break could simply be to stand up for a minute or two and stretch before returning to your work.
  • Reduce Workplace Stress. While some of this is out of your control, you can take some positive steps to reduce workplace stress. Speak up and ask for an extended deadline if the task needs it. Try to work out problems with coworkers respectfully and proactively.
  • Chiropractic Care. A qualified chiropractor can help you reduce low back pain when it happens and prevent it. Contact our office today for a no commitment consultation!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. June 2018 Volume 41, Issue 5, Pages 405–412
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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New Study Finds Obese Seniors Can Improve Disability with Diet and Exercise

According to a new U.S. study, seniors age 65-79 may be able to improve their disability and lessen fatigue if they start exercising more.  Plus, if they cut calories, they may achieve overall improved health.  Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina conducted the study. The experiment involved 180 obese senior adults from the age of 65 to 79 years-old.  Each participant was randomly given a 20-week task: Regular aerobic activity, or regular aerobic activity combined with cutting calories.  All 180 seniors focused on treadmill exercises at least 4 days per week. However, the group assigned to cut calories also were instructed to eat at least 250-600 fewer calories per day, as well.  According to the study, the group who exercised and cut calories was able to increase their exercise capacity (the body’s ability to supply oxygen to muscles during longer exercise sessions) by 14-16%.  Meanwhile, the seniors who only focused on aerobic exercise increased their exercise capacity by nearly 8%.  The researchers concluded, in general, people who cut a moderate amount of calories from their diets and complete regular aerobic workouts will see good results.  You don’t have to slash calories drastically, because this is difficult to keep up.  Best of all, anyone at any stage of life, even people who are both obese and elderly, will see health benefits from getting active and eating less.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Journals of Gerontology Series B, online July 5, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Even Bad Cholesterol in the Moderate Range Can Spell Early Death

Adults who don't keep their "bad cholesterol" numbers at bay, who are otherwise healthy, are far likelier to die early deaths from cardiovascular issues than those who keep their cholesterol in the "good" range.  A recent study from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at data from over 36,000 patients with zero past incidences of diabetes or heart disease, including a low risk for heart attacks and strokes.  However, these patients had some level of LDL-C ("bad cholesterol" that can build up in your blood vessels), although it was low enough not to warrant prescription cholesterol medication, called statins.  The follow-up period for the study was around 27 years. During this time, over 1,000 people died from cardiovascular disease, while nearly 600 died from heart disease.  According to the study, the higher the person's LDL-C levels (ranging from 100 to 190 mg/DL), the higher their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease or complications.  Usually, physicians don't prescribe statins unless the patient's cholesterol level reaches a threshold of 190 mg/DL.  This means even moderate levels of LDL-C can put you at risk.  Researchers say that the biggest takeaway from the study data is that a low risk for 10-year cardiovascular events does not mean the risk posed by higher LDL-C levels is wiped out.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online August 20, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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